Eminem Annotates His Own Lyrics On Rap Genius

Eminem has annotated forty of his tracks for lyrics website rap genius.

Eminem has decided to bless fans, joining several other artists, including super-producer Rick Rubin, R n B singer The-Dream, producer A-Track and many more verified artists in dissecting their work.

The annotations follow the recent 15th anniversary of Shady Records. The Detroit born self-proclaimed Rap God provides an insightful background into some of his biggest and most important tracks as well as delving into his mental state when he recorded certain songs.

Peep some of his critiques below:

On “My Name Is”:

“My Name Is” was the first thing that came out of my mouth that first day I was at Dre’s house. I don’t know if we released what I did the first day or if I re-did it, but it was basically the same. I didn’t understand punching, or believe in it. So I would just go from the top of the song all the way down. I was never flying in hooks. Everything was live, one take. If I got all the way to the fucking end, and messed up the last word, I’d be like “Run it back, let’s do it again.” I remember Dre was like “Yo, are you fucking crazy? Let’s just punch.” I didn’t like that concept because I wasn’t used to it. When we were recording here in Detroit, in the beginning, I was saving up my money to go in. We only had an hour, you know? I’m like “One take down, alright, let’s go to the next song. Fuck it.” That’s what I was used to.

On “Lose Yourself”:

When we were making 8 Mile, I was revisiting this old CD from two years before, going through old loops. I found the “Lose Yourself” demo on this session where me and Jeff Bass were just making beats. Jeff was just sitting on those guitar chords, and then it went into something different. I was just like “Yo, that section, right there, I gotta make a beat out of that.” I recorded the demo version of it the same day I made the beat. I didn’t like the rhyme, and put it off to the side.

But it’s one of those beats I never gave up on. That beat was definitely a highlight of my producing. I ended up doing the new version on the set of the movie, just writing between takes.

On “In Da Club”:

We couldn’t decide on the first single from Get Rich. It was going to be either “If I Can’t” or “In Da Club.” We were torn, so me, 50, Paul, Chris Lighty, and Jimmy Iovine decided to flip a coin.

Head over to Rolling Stone for a list of the top 10 lyrics he annotated.